Monday, April 23, 2012

Waaaaaaaaaaaambulence

“Are you going to call the "waaaaaambulance" or just embrace your life and do the best with what you have?

Don't let those who are biding their time with one foot in the summer put one of your feet in the grave. It isn't worth it. You do your best and stay focused. Do what is important. Hold students accountable. Find a way to have fun. Keep your wits about you and know that this too shall pass... very soon.

When someone else is sorry in their work performance, that doesn't give you an excuse to be sub par. Another teacher might go to work today in a dirty shirt, but does that make you want to don one too? Goodness no. Then why, when we see a teacher biding their time with their feet up on the desk showing a movie, do we use that as an excuse to do the same thing? You're noble. You care about teaching or you wouldn't be reading this right now. No one can take away your nobility but you can give it away yourself. Keep the nobility and the purpose in your classroom and teach until the last bell rings with a great attitude.”

The edublogosphere is alight with tales of the Dog Days of April, when conversations revolve around testing, Prom, tired educators, apprehensive administrators, disgruntled Seniors, and retiree/teachers that constantly talk like they have one foot out the door.  Leave it to Vicki Davis to reign us back in.

It’s funny that as an economist I’m constantly talking about “choice” with my students.  We all have choices in life.  As Vicki stated the choice to focus on something more meaningful than downer conversation is vitally important.  The recent pattern has been to come to school is a good mood, eat lunch amongst conversation of bedlam and horror, and end the day wondering what the hell had happened.  The “woe is me” talk is insanely thick right now with plenty of people darting out the door faster than Tupac at the Red Bluff Roundup. 

I have a job to do, and I enjoy it and I’m good at it.  The last bell is a long way off.  

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